White Collar Crime- Call a Criminal Lawyer Immediately

Posted by Chris Morales on Thu, Oct 04, 2012 @ 10:33 AM
People usually do not intentionally commit major fraud or embezzlement offenses. One thing leads to another and suddenly they simply find themselves talking to the police.

When facing any form of fraud such as identity theft, bank fraud, embezzlement, bribery, bad check distribution, conspiracy, money laundering, deceptive business practices, illegal gambling, internet crime or any other type of white collar criminal charges, it is mandatory to contact a highly experienced criminal defense attorney immediately.

People often use the phrase “white collar” and when they do, it is usually associated with easy punishments or less harsh sentences. Don’t be fooled. State prosecutors will prepare the case against them with as much aggressiveness as they would any violent criminal offense.

Protect Your Professional Future

Anytime someone is charged with a white collar offense, their personal future hangs in the balance. They will potentially face very serious penalties and punishments. This goes for both misdemeanor and felony white collar offenses. The end result is often a criminal record, jail, a prison sentence and/or steep fines.

It doesn't matter if they have been charged with a state or federal white collar crime. Prosecutors have the highest burden of proof to demonstrate the defendant committed that crime beyond any reasonable doubts. So how does someone accused of a white collar crime obtain the best possible sentence?

Only a highly experienced criminal defense lawyer can make successful efforts to create the most effective defense in a manner that can guarantee the prosecution does not easily satisfy the burden of proof.

The Criminal Defense Attorney Can Negotiate Plea Agreements

With aggressive, experienced defense attorneys, often after a person is charged with a crime, charges can be dropped as a result of the defense attorney's negotiations with the prosecutor.

In more difficult cases, the prosecutor may agree to drop more serious charges if the defendant agrees to plead guilty to lesser charges. Other situations call for cooperation with an ongoing investigation to obtain greater degrees of leniency. It is the defendant, not the attorney, who will always have the final word on whether to accept or reject any plea agreement.

Much depends on the severity of  the crime. Any defendant who is convicted may:

  • receive probation 
  • have a fine imposed
  • be ordered to perform community service 
  • be ordered to make restitution (pay back the losses caused by the criminal acts) 
  • be sentenced to prison 
  • or be sentenced to some combination of the above. 



Very experienced white collar criminal defense attorneys know how to work with prosecutors to negotiate deals that will provide the best possible sentence, or the least severe punishment. If no deal is available, he or she will aggressively represent the defendant in court. The goal is always to prove to the jury that the prosecutor cannot prove beyond any reasonable doubts that the accused has actually committed the crime.

Find The Criminal Defense Attorney For the Best Possible Sentence

Anytime a person is accused of a crime, it is frightening and stressful. A charge of a "white collar crime" imposes extra stress. This is because the person's professional or business integrity is usually the issue.

The best thing to do to receive the best possible sentence is to immediately contact the most experienced and aggressive criminal defense attorney, who specializes in white collar crimes.

What Exactly Constitutes The White Collar Crime?

The commonly used term "white collar crime" was first introduced by Edwin Sutherland in 1939. He delivered a speech to the American Sociological Society. In this speech, he defined white collar crime as  "a crime committed by a person of respectability and high social status in the course of his occupation."

Today, white collar crime refers to illegal actions generally committed in the business or professional setting that are designed to achieve greater financial gain. In general, most people understand that it sets the crime off from "blue collar" or "working class" crimes committed by less educated people who do not have as much access to bank accounts that can be manipulated.

Another term used to describe this is the term "paper crimes." This would include situations where the perpetrator uses deceit to obtain money, property or some other form of professional advantages.

Common white collar crimes usually include numbers of offenses such as mail fraud, securities fraud, embezzlement, conspiracy, tax evasion, Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) offenses, or any other form of financial crime including public corruption and bribery.

If you are someone who has been accused of a white collar crime, call for the most experienced help you can find, immediately.

white collar defendant in jail

Tags: securities fraud, fraud, white collar crime